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Many of us are feeling increased anxiety and uncertainty during this challenging time.  We are faced with working from home, educating from home and sometimes visiting with doctors or therapists from home.  Following are some articles that provide you with tips and strategies to manage the new situation you are facing.  These are for information purposes only and are not intended as professional advice.  Please stay healthy and safe and do reach out if there is any way that ASGA can assist you.  Please call our Help Desk at 330-940-1441 ext 1 or email us HERE.

 

 

MANAGING STRESS (from CDC)
The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may be stressful for people. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children. Coping with stress will make you, the people you care about, and your community stronger.

HOW TO REDUCE STRESS DURING SCHOOL CLOSURES (from Psychology Today)
Stress and anxiety can have a circular pattern within families. Parents are stressed and it trickles down, kids experience stress and exhibit behavioral symptoms, and this triggers more parental stress. The cycle can also begin with the kids and climb up to the parents. Either way, families need to prepare for stress and anxiety during this difficult time.  Know the signs of child and adolescent stress/anxiety and remember - it's okay to go back to the basics when things are still uncertain.

Research shows that just being in the presence of a compassionate, safe adult can help kids calm down. Families can be “that person” for each other. Reducing stress is something parents and children can work on, together.
 
 
TIPS FOR TALKING TO KIDS ABOUT THE CORONAVIRUS (from Child Mind Institute)
News of the coronavirus COVID-19 is everywhere, from the front page of all the papers to the playground at school. Many parents are wondering how to bring up the epidemic in a way that will be reassuring and not make kids more worried than they already may be. Experts at the Child Mind Institute offer some advice.
 
HOW TO TALK TO YOUR KIDS ABOUT CORONAVIRUS (from PBS Kids for Parents)

Deborah Farmer Kris, a writer, teacher, parent educator, and school administrator talks about how she talks with her kids about Coronavirus.  She gives tips for staying health along with a list of PBS KIDS videos, games and activities all about hand washing and staying healthy.

 
 
 
 
 
So, you find yourself suddenly having to work from home. Schools and daycares are closed. You not only have to continue being productive at work but also take care of and educate your children at the same time. COVID-19—thanks! What do you do?  Inna Khazan, Ph.D., BCB, a faculty member at Harvard Medical School offers some practical suggestions for navigating this transition from the perspective of work, family, and your wellbeing.
 
 
Kids need structure, and without a structured environment and routine children may experience severe anxiety.  Nicole Day, founder of the blog Raising an Extraordinary Person gives tips on how to structure the environment; structure the time; prepare for changes and structure demands. 

 

WHY KIDS NEED ROUTINE & HOW TO MAKE A VISUAL ROUTINE FOR YOUR HOME
Everyone touts using a visual schedule for children to provide them with structure and routine. But if you’ve never used one before you might be wondering how to make a visual schedule for your home.  Learn about the benefits of schedules and the steps to make one.

 

 
Now more than ever as a parent of a child with autism, you know that it can be a challenge to motivate them to complete homework assignments. Often during this process, children with ASD will express an array of problem behaviors including tantrums, noncompliance, and aggression. This can be stressful for parents and caregivers who can sometimes feel defeated. Hear tips from Board Certified Behavior Analysts that can help start you and your child on the road to success.
 
 
Meltdowns are no joke, and they’re definitely not “temper tantrums.” If you have ever dealt with a child having a meltdown, then you know that de-escalating the situation is no easy feat. A meltdown may seem unpredictable and include aggressive or destructive behavior.  It is very different from a temper tantrum because the child is not in control of themselves during the outburst. So, knowing how to prevent meltdowns proactively can reduce the need for de-escalation.
 
As a parent, it’s important to know some safe and helpful de-escalation strategies. Sometimes, when children become extremely overwhelmed or they’re experiencing sensory overload, they have a meltdown where they lose control over their behaviors.  These situations are stressful for everyone involved and potentially dangerous for both bystanders and your child. Knowing some de-escalation strategies will help you avoid a potential crisis.
 

HOW CHOICES CAN INCREASE COMPLIANCE
Compliance can be a real challenge. Often this is due to the child's tendency to intently focus on what he is doing to the point where any disruption, such as the request to transition, can lead to noncompliance, aggressive behavior and meltdowns.  Amy Nielsen, former educator and mother of four including a child with ASD provides some tips on giving choices that might increase compliance which in turn might decrease aggressive behavior and meltdowns.

HEAVY WORK ACTIVITIES CAN BE CALMING
Heavy work may help calm your child when they’re hyperactive or having trouble keeping their bodies calm.  It also helps with emotional regulation and may serve as a successful coping strategy.  Heavy work can help adults to calm down or deal with stress too.  It’s not just for kids.  Do you, or someone you know, like to clean when they get mad? What about exercise? Punch a punching bag? Those are all forms of heavy work.  Nicole Day, Founder of the blog Raising an Extraordinary Person has a compiled a list of heavy work activities in a variety of categories including:  exercise, in-chair activities, outdoor activities and chores along with household chores.